EXPERT SESSIONS AND ADVICE FROM QUALIFIED AND EXPERIENCED GRASSROOTS RUGBY COACHES

7 steps to killer back moves

Good teams will refresh their playbook from year to year to keep opponents on the hop. Before you design some imaginative new moves to excite your players, here are the key guidelines…

1  IDENTIFY YOUR STRIKE RUNNER AND HIS TARGET

Play to your strengths. If you have a quick full back, for example, devise moves to get him into the game as often as possible and in a variety of channels.

Aim to vary your strike runners and the areas they’re targeting, but always set a target area so support runners know where they need to be.

2  IDENTIFY THE BALL SUPPLIER

This is the player who’s going to pass to the strike runner. It’s usually the 10 but can be 12 or 13 if you’re attacking a wider channel.

3  IDENTIFY DECOY RUNNERS

Think of these as “strike runners who don’t get the ball”. They should run with the same purpose as the strike runner to commit defenders. They must expect the ball in case the ball supplier spots a gap opening up for them.

4  HOW CLOSE TO THE GAIN LINE?

This depends on your players’ skill levels but in general the closer to the gain line you operate, the more likely you are to cross it. To go wide, you’ll have to operate deeper than if you go short.

5  THE PURPOSE OF THE MOVE

Not all moves have to penetrate the defence. You can use strike runners to suck in defenders and provide quick ball for a second-phase attack.

6  ALLOCATE SUPPORT TASKS

Whatever the anticipated outcome of the move, everyone needs to be aware of all eventualities – especially when and where they need to be to support the strike runner.

Whether the strike runner busts the line, gets held but can offload or gets tackled and goes to ground, the support must be in position and ready to act.

7  STARTING POSITIONS

Once you’ve decided who’s going to end up where and how they’re going to get there, you can determine where each player needs to start from to best disguise what you want to achieve.

Don’t always start with a regular set-up. Try spreading or compressing the line, putting a winger beside the 10, or postioning the open-side winger right on the touchline.

 

See how this works in practice with this play from Ireland against Argentina.

Share this
Follow us