EXPERT SESSIONS AND ADVICE FROM QUALIFIED AND EXPERIENCED GRASSROOTS RUGBY COACHES

More powerful ground and standing passes

Former Currie Cup scrum-half and RugbyIQ founder, Greg Commins breaks down the key skills for passing from the ground or when standing up, to generate more power.

HAND PLACEMENT

When working on the pass, it is important to have the correct hand placement on the ball.

The back hand is the “trigger”, which generates most of the power and the front hand is mainly used to steer the pass.

The front hand should not try to influence the pass too much. Its job is to stabilise the flight of the pass and assist with ball rotation.

The range of motion for the back arm is far greater than the front. It moves almost twice as much as the front arm – therefore the back arm is the main driving force.

PASSING ACTIVITIES

Correct passing mechanics will ensure the player is set to deliver the pass but will not guarantee it arrives at the target.

Accuracy is fine-tuned through repetitive static (standing or kneeling) and dynamic (moving) passing drills with targets.

Passing practice without a target can develop inaccurate habits, as the eyes will not focus on a destination and the passer will launch the ball into space hoping they land in front of the receiver. Ideally another player is best, but targets on walls or the posts can be used instead.

COMPARING THE PASSES

When the two passes are placed next to each other you will be able to see the common movement patterns. The head is in front of the ball, which gives the feeling of loading the spring. The head is turned before the pass and then weight is transferred onto the front foot, with a finish position of hands “shooting the guns” towards the target.

SHOOT THE GUNS

The passer’s hands should be pointing at the target at the end of the pass. Move through the pass as this will make it easier to stay low and create good pass trajectory.

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