EXPERT SESSIONS AND ADVICE FROM QUALIFIED AND EXPERIENCED GRASSROOTS RUGBY COACHES

Attack blindside from a scrum

The 8-9-14 move from a right-hand scrum close to the line is excellent for scoring tries but needs variation depending on the strength of opposition defence.

  1. 8 picks and runs to fix the blindside flanker (6)
  2. 9 takes a pass from 8, then attacks 11’s left shoulder. He either switch passes with 14 or dummies, depending on 11’s movements
  3. 14 starts wide and then cuts in to take a switch pass from 9

  1. 8 picks and runs to fix the blindside flanker (6)
  2. 9 passes early to 14 and then, holding his run, aims to go behind 14 to take a switch pass. Works well with a quick 9
  3. 14 starts wide, receives a pass from 9 and then cuts in. He either switch passes with 9 or dummies and goes himself

 

WHY USE IT

From a scrum on the 15m line in their 22, use an 8 pick up, run and pass to 9, who draws their winger to score. But you might need variations when the defending winger is able to close the space very quickly.

SET UP

A right-hand scrum with 10 to 15m of blindside available.

HOW TO DO IT

The 9-14 switch

The attacking winger (14) keeps wide to his touchline but as the defending 11 approaches the 9, he runs a switch with 9. This provides enough inside space to attack and score in if 11 stays on 9. If 11 moves with the 14, 9 can dummy the switch and score around the right-hand side. If the switch is made with the winger, be aware of the defending number 8.

The 14-9 switch

Another switch move, this time an early ball from 9 to 14 focuses play close to the touchline. The 14 cuts in and switches with 9 going on the outside. Of course, 14 can dummy if he wants. This move exploits a speedy 9 but also can work well for a winger who is not fast. The angle of the run wrongfoots the defending winger and it is an easy pass on the switch.


LOOK UP AND SEE THE SPACE

If the defence overcompensates to cover blindside attacks, this leaves space elsewhere. By stretching your own backline the width of the field on the open side, this leaves an unmarked player to attack with. Or if their fullback has filled in the backline, there is space behind to exploit with a grubber or chip kick.

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