EXPERT SESSIONS AND ADVICE FROM QUALIFIED AND EXPERIENCED GRASSROOTS RUGBY COACHES

How to do deal with coaching errors and not just yours

Everyone makes mistakes or needs to change, even you. How you deal with them is a measure of how your team and coaches progress positively. Use these simple methods to move on quickly.

MAKING A MISTAKE IN TRAINING

If you make a mistake in training then you put your hand up straightaway. Mistakes will happen and you should always admit to them. Once you have admitted to a mistake, you need to reclaim the something.  

Here are two ways to do this: 

  1. SayI didn’t get my message across, sorry. Let’s put in another way”. Or ask a player or another coach to help out. “Robbie, help me out here, what am I trying to say here? 
  2. Ask a player for a punishment. Make it light-hearted. “How many press-ups should I do for that one, 10 or 20! It will be gone and forgotten by the start of the next training session.  

TELLING A CO-COACH THEY NEED TO CHANGE

Sometimes one of your own coaches will be making an error. Perhaps it is technical, or it could be a management issue, like not praising a player enough.  

Feedback needs to be construed as a positive no matter what. In a coaching team you should always be focusing on improvement and best practice.

If you can meet up with your co-coaches on a regular basis you can start to build a relationship where all concerned can discuss important matters.

If you are asking a co-coach to change what he does, do it over a period of time and don’t focus on too many areas. I like to do this in a comfortable environment and also to open myself up at the same time to.

I might ask the co-coach his opinion on how we’re doing things and then offer some advice on how he is doing things. 

It is also worth doing this exercise in threes. While you are giving advice to one coach the other coach may be thinking that that advice could be useful to them as well and they will take it on board inner something now.

It is absolutely key that you do not criticize the perceived area of strength. In times gone past I have approached a scrum coach and been to blunt about the way I think the scrum should be going. Instead it would have been better to say something like how do you think scrum is going?”   

If he doesn’t focus on the area you want, you can then guide him by asking about the consequences. For instance, “we are struggling to produce stable ball from the scrums, what are your thoughts?” 

Share this
Follow us
X