EXPERT SESSIONS AND ADVICE FROM QUALIFIED AND EXPERIENCED GRASSROOTS RUGBY COACHES

Global law trials for 2021

World Rugby has sanctioned a raft of Global Law Trials.

Ellis Genge is about to be held up over the goal line. This will now be a goal line drop-out

Our team of writers will be delving into the implications and how you can adjust your tactics and skills training accordingly. In the meantime, let’s consider the changes.

Ahead of the changes, Adam Wookey, an RFU Panel referee shared his thoughts on how these might look, as well as the tackle laws for younger players.

Here’s a quick run down of the trials.


WORLD RUGBY says

50:22

The trial

If the team in possession kicks the ball from inside their own half indirectly into touch inside their opponents’ 22, they will throw into the resultant lineout. The ball cannot be passed or carried back into the defensive half for the 50:22 to be played. The phase must originate inside the defensive half.

Primary intention

To encourage the defensive team to put more players in the backfield, thereby creating more attacking space and reducing defensive line speed.

OUR COMMENT

This is a risk and reward tactic for both attack and defence. At the top level of the game, teams comfortably put 13 to 14 players in the defensive front line. However, at lower levels, it’s perfectly possible to have a front line defence of 13 players with a winger and full back covering the touchlines.

Areas to consider:

  • Kicks from 10 and from 12 and 13
  • What sorts of kicks work best
  • What triggers do you look for to kick
  • When do the “wingers” drop back
  • Can the defence “sell” the space to kick to and then cover it late
  • What does the chase look like
  • How do you counter attack, and do you need to spend more time on counter attack options from your own half

Try out this game


WORLD RUGBY says

Goal line drop-out

The trial

If the ball is held up in in-goal, there is a knock-on from an attacking player in in-goal or an attacking kick is grounded by the defenders in their own in-goal, then play restarts with a goal line drop-out anywhere along the goal line.

Primary intention

To encourage variety in attacking play close to the goal line and to increase ball in play time by replacing a scrum with a kick that must be taken without delay. An opportunity for counter attack is also created.

OUR COMMENT

The devil is in the detail here. First, at the top level, teams might rethink their goal line attacks, because a drop out from the goal line is a bigger territory loss than previously having a scrum. They might “spread” the ball further away from the mass of defenders close to the line.

Second, let’s consider the long kick from the attacking team which goes in-goal. Normally you might touch it down and have a 22m. Now, you might choose to have a goal line kick or take the risk and run it out. Again, a risk and reward decision, which is worth talking through before the game.

Third, it’s the “without delay” and “anywhere along the goal line”. The receiving team need to be ready to cover all these options. The kicking team need to think where to kick from.

Areas to consider:

  • Long drop kicks
  • Lots of drop kick options
  • Thinking about kicking to score, and whether you might want to keep the ball in hand
  • Goal line attack: tap and go options from penalties? And, whether you think you need to attack a bit wider out.
  • Is there a chance to goal line kick 5m to retain possession?
  • When you receive a goal line, how do you attack, and who do you prefer to carry the ball forward

WORLD RUGBY says

Flying wedge

The trial

To sanction the three person pre-bound mini-scrum by redefining the flying wedge.

Primary intention

To reduce number of events where the ball carrier and multiple support players are in contact (latched) prior to contact, and to protect the tackler who can be faced with the combined force of three opposing players.

OUR COMMENT

The wedge is mostly for teams who are close to the goal line. A more recent introduction (or a return to an old tactic at least) into the game, so probably not relevant to most sides.


WORLD RUGBY says

1-player pre-latched

The trial

To recognise the potential for 1-player pre-latching prior to contact, but this player must observe all of the requirements for a first arriving player, particularly the need to stay on their feet.

Primary intention

To be more consistent in the management of the 1-person pre-latched player.

OUR COMMENT

Latching is a valid method of creating additional force at the point of contact. World Rugby wants referees to make sure the latcher is not blocking tacklers and they don’t “seal” off the ball when the ball carrier is tackled.

Use this exercise to improve your latching skills.


WORLD RUGBY says

Cleanout and the safety of the jackler

The trial

To introduce a sanction for clean outs which target or drop weight onto the lower limbs.

Primary intention

To reduce injury risk to the player being cleaned out.

OUR COMMENT

This is the first time “jackler” has been formally mentioned in the law book.

Referees will be looking for the clearing attacking player to arrive like a plane taking off. And, the clearing player mustn’t grab the jackler’s legs to drive them out.

We think that the clearing player will need to arrive in a more controlled manner, balanced and ready to drive through and up through the jackler.

Use this guide and activity to improve your clearouts.


World Rugby has put out some great videos to accompany these laws.

Click here to find out more.

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